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Hypothyroidism Lead a Better Quality of Life
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Hypothyroidism

Symptoms

Below, you will find a list of symptoms, both physical and psychological, that are experienced by women who have under active thyroid function. These symptoms may vary in degree and in intensity.

Physical Symptoms

  • Weight gain/ difficulty in losing weight
  • Always feeling cold, severely affected by cold weather, hands and feet always cold.
  • Water retention
  • Dry hair and/or hair loss.
  • Dry skin and brittle fingernails
  • Constipation
  • Irregular periods, heavy menstrual flow, infertility, miscarriages
  • Joint or muscle pains
  • Carpal and/or Metatarsal Tunnel syndrome
  • Tingling or numbness of the hands or feet
  • Hearing Ringing or Ticking in the inner ear
  • Diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Fibromyalgia

Checklist of Psychological Symptoms

  • Fatigue
  • Depression
  • Decreased Sex Drive
  • Mentally Foggy
  • Decreased Concentration (AADD)
  • Poor Recent Memory
  • Postpartum Depression

New Thyroid Range

The Thyroid

By Hugh D. Melnick, MD

The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly shaped mass of tissue found in the neck, just below the “Adam’s Apple.” Despite its small size, it has a critical role in determining how our bodies function, and, ultimately, how well we feel.The thyroid controls the body’s metabolism, which is the energy supply that is essential for all bodily functions. Think of the thyroid gland as an automobile’s fuel pump. If the pump is not working up to capacity, the car’s engine will not get enough fuel, and will run slowly and inefficiently. Should the pump supply too much fuel to the engine, it will run too fast and eventually burn out. An underactive thyroid gland causes a medical condition known as hypothyroidism .

Think of the thyroid gland as an automobile’s fuel pump. If the pump is not working up to capacity, the car’s engine will not get enough fuel, and will run slowly and inefficiently. Should the pump supply too much fuel to the engine, it will run too fast and eventually burn out. An underactive thyroid gland causes a medical condition known as hypothyroidism.

For some unknown reason, it occurs much more frequently in women than in men, and as many as 15% of the female population may have some degree of thyroid under activity.

Symptoms

The symptoms of hypothyroidism are quite common and diverse. Fortunately, they are rarely life threatening. Nevertheless, they are very disturbing since they affect the way a woman looks and feels, both physically and emotionally. Without any doubt, an untreated under active thyroid gland can have a profoundly negative effect upon a woman’s quality of life.

Having seen the wide spectrum of symptoms associated with hypothyroidism, it is apparent that they are extremely common complaints, experienced by many women. It is quite possible that either you, one of your friends or a family member is plagued by one or more of these troublesome symptoms. Many times, women with these complaints have been tested for hypothyroidism and were told that, despite their symptoms, they did not have an under active thyroid gland because their thyroid blood test results were within the normal range. They may have been told that their symptoms are part of the “normal” ageing process or are caused by anxiety or depression. In many instances, they are referred to a psychiatrist for treatment with antidepressants and psychotherapy, but often these treatments may not make a symptomatic woman feel better.

Subclinical Hypothryoidism

Such symptomatic individuals may actually have a condition known as Subclinical Hypothyroidism . In this clinical condition, a patient may be symptomatically hypothyroid, yet her blood tests may suggest, but not fully support, the diagnosis of thyroid gland under activity. In subclinical hypothyroidism, there is a partial decrease in the thyroid glands ability to produce enough hormones to make the body’s metabolism work at 100% efficiency; hence an individual will be symptomatic. Such individuals may benefit from a therapeutic trial of treatment with a natural prescription thyroid supplement.

There are two basic problems that account for the failure to diagnose many cases of subclinical hypothyroidism. First is that what is considered to be the “normal range” for one of the main blood tests used to diagnose hypothyroidism (TSH-Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) is a bit too narrow to diagnose many patients who are symptomatically hypothyroidism.

Recently, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (A.A.C.E.) has recognized this fact and has reduced the normal TSH levels from 5.0 to 3.0, a change which will allow at least 15% more symptomatic individuals to be diagnosed as having hypothyroidism. Unfortunately, most clinical laboratories have not yet included this change in their laboratory reports. In addition to TSH levels, the amount of other thyroid hormones such as T4 and T3, as well as antibodies against thyroid tissue, must be evaluated in any woman having symptoms associated with hypothyroidism